Posts Tagged ‘Yahoo’

Don’t get caught up in Third-screen thinking

May 8, 2008

Mobilenet Promises to Be the Next Big Medium     But Don’t Get Sidetracked Into Third-Screen Thinking     From AdAge Published: May 06, 2008 by Al Ries>>read more.     We are on the verge of witnessing the birth of a new mass-communications medium. It’s the second new mass medium to appear in the last two decades.     The internet arrived in the 1990s, joining the other four mass media: 1) The book 2) The periodical 3) Radio 4) TV. Each new mass medium has created enormous upheavals in society.     The book ignited the knowledge explosion.      The periodical furthered the growth of democracy.     Radio created a celebrity-oriented society.     TV homogenized the culture.      The internet, the latest and newest mass medium, continues to make waves. “We are not witnessing the beginning of the end of old media,” Advertising Age’s Bob Garfield wrote recently. “We are witnessing the middle of the end of old media.”     “Both print and broadcast — burdened with unwieldy, archaic and crushingly expensive means of distribution — are experiencing the disintegration of the audience critical mass they require to operate profitably,” Mr. Garfield continued. “Moreover, they are losing that audience to the infinitely fragmented digital media, which have near-zero distribution costs and are overwhelmingly free to the user.”     Fasten your seat belts. On the horizon, there’s another profound shift in media, consumer behavior and technology coming. In the near future we are likely to welcome the arrival of a sixth mass-communications medium.     And what is this earth-shaking new medium? It’s the Mobilenet.     The what? Surely you are joking, Al. The Mobilenet is just a subset of the internet. Just another way of going online. Just another way of surfing the net without using a computer. That’s why mobile devices are commonly called the “third screen.”      Third-screen thinking is going to cause you and your company to miss the boat. Which big brands were created by moving content from one medium to another? Very, very few.      Moving The Wall Street Journal online didn’t save Dow Jones from the clutches of Rupert Murdoch for just $5 billion.      Moving ESPN onto cellphones didn’t take it to the big leagues.     So far, moving TV shows to the internet hasn’t created as much value as one internet site, YouTube.com. Less than 20 months after its launch, YouTube was bought by Google for $1.65 billion.

Advertisements

China censors Internet–yea, good luck with that…

April 19, 2008

Protesters hold a “Support Olympics” banner at a Chinese branch of a French market chain. France is a target because the Olympic torch relay was disrupted there.From the Los Angeles Times By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer April 19, 2008 Picture Wu Hong / EPA click to read more.   
ANGER IS HIGH: Protesters hold a “Support Olympics” banner at a Chinese branch of a French market chain. France is a target because the Olympic torch relay was disrupted there.     Beijing has fanned the nationalism, critics say, but doesn’t want it to get out of hand before the Summer Olympics.     BEIJING — As Chinese nationalism flares across cyberspace, the government is growing concerned that passions could spill over into the real world, and that anger directed against foreigners could turn inward.     Critics contend that Beijing has had a role in fanning the xenophobic sentiment to counter international condemnation of its crackdown on Tibetan rioters, but now Chinese officials appear to be trying to rein in the vitriol.     Chinese censors have quietly warned cyber-police and Internet businesses to delete all information related to protests against Western policies, nations or companies that have proliferated in the wake of demonstrations surrounding the global Olympic torch relay and high-level calls to boycott the opening ceremony of the Summer Games in Beijing.–Ummmm, aren’t the Internet businesses they’re talking about Google and Yahoo?

Gorillas Playing in the Jungle

April 6, 2008

Posted by Dawn Kawamoto on news.com     Microsoft on Saturday issued an ultimatum to Yahoo, giving the Internet search pioneer three weeks to enter formal merger negotiations and conclude a deal.      The software giant threatened to launch a proxy fight to unseat Yahoo’s board of directors, as well as take its case straight to Yahoo investors should no deal be reached in that period.      And as a further cattle prod in getting a deal consummated, Microsoft threatened to lower its existing bid, citing how Yahoo’s value will be hurt if it needs to resort to such hostile means.      “If we have not concluded an agreement within the next three weeks, we will be compelled to take our case directly to your shareholders, including the initiation of a proxy contest to elect an alternative slate of directors for the Yahoo board,” Steve Ballmer, Microsoft chief executive, stated in his letter to Yahoo’s board of directors. “The substantial premium reflected in our initial proposal anticipated a friendly transaction with you. If we are forced to take an offer directly to your shareholders, that action will have an undesirable impact on the value of your company from our perspective which will be reflected in the terms of our proposal.”      Microsoft initially offered an unsolicited buyout bid of $31 per share for Yahoo back on February 1.