Posts Tagged ‘Shell Oil’

C’mon Chuck Schumer, what are you doin for us anyway?

June 1, 2008

On CSPAN 5/21/2008: WASHINGTON, DC: 2 hr. 59 min.: CSPAN3 you will find Senate Judiciary Cmte. hearing on Rising Crude Oil Prices. The oil industry blames the rising price of consumer gasoline on increases in the cost of crude oil. Executives from BP America, Shell Oil Co., Chevron Corp., ConocPhilips Co., and Exxon Mobil Corp. testify today at a Senate Judiciary Cmte. hearing on unrefined petroleum production.
NYS Senator Charles SchumerOK I get the Senate Committee are pointing their collective finger at the panel made up of oil executives, but aren’t the three remaining fingers on the Senate hand pointing back at them?  What is the Senate doing for us on this matter; and the House for the that matter?  Senator Schumer asked the oil compaines how much they are spending on alternative energy research, then said it was not enough.  Well Senator, I voted for you.  With regards to alternative energy research, what are you and your “buddies” in DC doing about alternative energy any way?

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Oil Has Two Potential Futures, Shell Strategist Says

April 23, 2008

China Photos People buy diesel oil at a gas station on November 19, 2007 in Wuhan of Hubei Province, China, the world's second largest oil consumer. Getty ImagesFrom NPR Morning Edition, April 22, 2008 click to read more. · As oil prices hit $117 a barrel this month, a forecast from Shell Oil outlines two very different possibilities for the future of the world’s energy supply. Looking out to the year 2050, Shell strategist Jeremy Bentham says demand will go up, while oil supplies will be harder to find. But how nations and companies react is harder to predict.     “We anticipate that you’ll begin to see a plateauing of easily accessible conventional oil and gas around about the 2015, 2020 type of period,” Bentham tells Steve Inskeep.     Bentham outlines two outcomes — one a “scramble” and the other a “blueprint” scenario — for addressing energy needs.     In the scramble scenario, he says, “a focus on supply security drives a lot of decision-making.” For example, China is worried about its future supply of oil, so it decides that it needs to be friendly with Iran. Or the U.S., worried about its supply of oil, holds intensive talks with Saudi Arabia.     “That can kick off a dynamic where the tensions are perceived to be a fight between nations and hence a scramble for supply. The demand side is postponed, in terms of being managed, in that scramble outlook,” Bentham says.      So, a fear of shortage of supply builds up, and the steps to manage the whole energy system holistically aren’t taken, Bentham says. Instead of considering conservation or alternatives, people just grab for oil and other forms of energy.     The “blueprint” scenario, on the other hand, recognizes that forces can combine to affect change. “You see emerging coalitions coming together at the state level but also cross-border” to find solutions, Bentham says.     He points to climate-related legislation in California as an example.     “A set of interests were recognized among technology entrepreneurs and farmers and shrewd politicians which led, in this country in 2006, to the climate-related legislation in California,” he says.