Posts Tagged ‘Music’

Prince has his Radiohead cake and eats too!

June 1, 2008

Radiohead was pleased Prince had covered From CNN updated 1:23 p.m. EDT, Fri May 30, 2008     Radiohead to Prince: Hey, that’s OUR song>>read more.          WASHINGTON (AP) — After word spread that Prince covered Radiohead’s “Creep” at Coachella, the tens of thousands who couldn’t be there ran to YouTube for a peek. Everyone was quickly denied — even Radiohead.     Radiohead was pleased Prince had covered “Creep.” But who has the right to put online?       All videos of Prince’s unique rendition of Radiohead’s early hit were quickly taken down, leaving only a message that his label, NPG Records, had removed the clips, claiming a copyright violation. But the posted videos were shot by fans and, obviously, the song isn’t Prince’s.     In a recent interview, Thom Yorke said he heard about Prince’s performance from a text message and thought it was “hilarious.” Yorke laughed when his bandmate, guitarist Ed O’Brien, said the blocking had prevented him from seeing Richard Drew / AP file photo Prince's frustration with his label led him to adopt an unpronounceable symbol as a name and write Prince’s version of their song.      “Really? He’s blocked it?” asked Yorke, who figured it was their song to block or not. “Surely we should block it. Hang on a moment.”     Yorke added: “Well, tell him to unblock it. It’s our … song.”
Prince>>read more.: As the result of a complicated dispute with Warner over a six-album deal signed in 1992, he announced that he was changing his name to a symbol and took to wearing a scarf over his face in public. When he ditched the scarf he started writing ‘slave’ on his right cheek, just in case anyone had failed to get the point.

 

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Laptop concert linking Stanford and Beijing

May 1, 2008

A student uses the keyboard to control the sound produced from his 6-speaker array (seen at left) during a rehearsal of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra in the Knoll building on campus in Palo Alto, April 24, 2008. Ech of the 20 speaker arrays is built from an IKEA salad bowl, amplifier kit and car speakers.The ensemble of 20 musicians is comprised of under graduates, master's students and doctoral students from the university community. (David M. Barreda / Mercury News)Laptop concert linking Stanford and Beijing signals world has changed 6,000 MILES APART, PAN-ASIAN FESTIVAL MUSICIANS USE THE NET TO COLLABORATE IN REAL TIME FRom the Mercury News By Richard Scheinin Article Launched: 04/30/2008 03:55:21 PM PDT photo by (David M. Barreda / Mercury News)>>read more.     Do you remember the Jefferson Airplane doing a tune called “Fat Angel” in 1968? It was recorded live at the Fillmore (whether in San Francisco or New York wasn’t clear from the album jacket), and the lyrics went like this: “Fly Translove Airways, gets you there on time.” Very trippy, very mesmerizing, very new. You listened and knew the world was changing.     Tuesday night at Stanford University’s Dinkelspiel Auditorium, there was a concert titled “Pacific Rim of Wire,” and, 40 years after “Fat Angel,” it evoked similar feelings of mesmerizing newness. It was a night of electro-acoustic, trans-global music-making: Musicians at Dinkelspiel (the Stanford Laptop Orchestra, as well as players on traditional concert instruments) were literally – via the Internet, in real time – performing with musicians in China (on a smaller array of electronic and acoustic instruments).     The musicians in this “networked performance” – part of Stanford’s ongoing Pan-Asian Music Festival – could see one another, hear one another and respond musically to one another. The 200 or so listeners in Dinkelspiel could watch and hear not only the musicians on stage, but the musicians in China (6,000 miles distant and 15 hours ahead of California), whose images were projected on a giant screen at the rear of the stage. The small audience at Beijing University could see and hear everything happening in Dinkelspiel.     The combined sounds of two continents droned and pulsed, highly ritualistic, at times gorgeous, unfolding like electronic flowers, full of new moods and colors and tonalities – and, occasionally, they were a mishmash.     Still, the players were communing across the planet: This was the real Translove Airways.      I can’t say that Dinkelspiel is “the new Fillmore” – where all this goes is totally up in the air, and, besides, I’m a neophyte with this music.     But as was the case in the ’60s, what happened Tuesday night was about more than the music. It raised basic questions: What does it mean to “be here,” when here is there, and there is here? For that matter, what does it mean “to see” in this age of Skype and networked performances? After all, the musicians in China were seeing us, literally, and we were seeing them.     The concert was as much a technical as a musical coup, and the folks at Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) deserve credit for instigating and carrying it off in conjunction with the technical people in Beijing – who could be seen sipping bottled water and waving to the Dinkelspiel crowd during the performance.

CRAP! they’re back

April 3, 2008

New Kids on the Block boy band
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