Posts Tagged ‘Energy’

Listening to him is painful and makes me squirm.

April 30, 2008

Ron Edmonds President Bush speaks during a news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 29, 2008. APFrom NPR.org, April 29, 2008 by Scott Neuman click to read more or listen.    
Bush Blames Congress for High Energy Prices Saying that Americans were “understandably anxious” about the economy, President Bush blamed Congress for high energy and food prices. The president said lawmakers blocked his proposals to address the problems. –Am I the only one that feels embarrassed every time our C+ President opens his mouth?  Even if what he is saying true–but how can you know that?  Listening to him try to use the English Language is painful and makes me squirm.  The real joke is on the corporations who will pay him to speak after he leaves office.

Oil Has Two Potential Futures, Shell Strategist Says

April 23, 2008

China Photos People buy diesel oil at a gas station on November 19, 2007 in Wuhan of Hubei Province, China, the world's second largest oil consumer. Getty ImagesFrom NPR Morning Edition, April 22, 2008 click to read more. · As oil prices hit $117 a barrel this month, a forecast from Shell Oil outlines two very different possibilities for the future of the world’s energy supply. Looking out to the year 2050, Shell strategist Jeremy Bentham says demand will go up, while oil supplies will be harder to find. But how nations and companies react is harder to predict.     “We anticipate that you’ll begin to see a plateauing of easily accessible conventional oil and gas around about the 2015, 2020 type of period,” Bentham tells Steve Inskeep.     Bentham outlines two outcomes — one a “scramble” and the other a “blueprint” scenario — for addressing energy needs.     In the scramble scenario, he says, “a focus on supply security drives a lot of decision-making.” For example, China is worried about its future supply of oil, so it decides that it needs to be friendly with Iran. Or the U.S., worried about its supply of oil, holds intensive talks with Saudi Arabia.     “That can kick off a dynamic where the tensions are perceived to be a fight between nations and hence a scramble for supply. The demand side is postponed, in terms of being managed, in that scramble outlook,” Bentham says.      So, a fear of shortage of supply builds up, and the steps to manage the whole energy system holistically aren’t taken, Bentham says. Instead of considering conservation or alternatives, people just grab for oil and other forms of energy.     The “blueprint” scenario, on the other hand, recognizes that forces can combine to affect change. “You see emerging coalitions coming together at the state level but also cross-border” to find solutions, Bentham says.     He points to climate-related legislation in California as an example.     “A set of interests were recognized among technology entrepreneurs and farmers and shrewd politicians which led, in this country in 2006, to the climate-related legislation in California,” he says.

 

Lipstick on a Pig

April 19, 2008

Strip Mining Landscape ImprovementsFrom Energy Tomorrow, click to read more
Demand for energy is rising around the world, according to the U.S. Department of Energy and the International Energy Administration. Data show global demand for oil and natural gas will likely grow 45% by 2030 compared with 2006. The Department of Interior estimates there are 112 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil beneath U.S. federal lands and coastal waters. That’s enough oil to fuel 60 million cars for 60 years, when you take into account the average yield of gasoline from a barrel of crude oil and the average number of gallons of gasoline consumed annually by a passenger vehicle.  Yea OK lets settle.  Let’s do no alternative energy research and besides, strip mining adds so much to the public landscape.  Read related post.

Poll: Americans Prefer Energy Fix to Cancer Cure

April 4, 2008

by Kenny Luna, North Babylon, NY 04. 3.08 on Tree Hugger
A nationwide survey of nearly 700 people suggests Americans would prefer that more money be invested in technology to solve our energy problems than to cure cancer or other diseases. In fact, roughly 37 percent of respondents said they would rank spending to raise energy efficiency and develop alternative fuel technology a top priority for future investment compared to just 30 percent who ranked more cash for breakthroughs on problems such as cancer as being most important.    Read more: Poll: Americans Prefer Energy Fix to Cancer Cure