Posts Tagged ‘Beijing’

Laptop concert linking Stanford and Beijing

May 1, 2008

A student uses the keyboard to control the sound produced from his 6-speaker array (seen at left) during a rehearsal of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra in the Knoll building on campus in Palo Alto, April 24, 2008. Ech of the 20 speaker arrays is built from an IKEA salad bowl, amplifier kit and car speakers.The ensemble of 20 musicians is comprised of under graduates, master's students and doctoral students from the university community. (David M. Barreda / Mercury News)Laptop concert linking Stanford and Beijing signals world has changed 6,000 MILES APART, PAN-ASIAN FESTIVAL MUSICIANS USE THE NET TO COLLABORATE IN REAL TIME FRom the Mercury News By Richard Scheinin Article Launched: 04/30/2008 03:55:21 PM PDT photo by (David M. Barreda / Mercury News)>>read more.     Do you remember the Jefferson Airplane doing a tune called “Fat Angel” in 1968? It was recorded live at the Fillmore (whether in San Francisco or New York wasn’t clear from the album jacket), and the lyrics went like this: “Fly Translove Airways, gets you there on time.” Very trippy, very mesmerizing, very new. You listened and knew the world was changing.     Tuesday night at Stanford University’s Dinkelspiel Auditorium, there was a concert titled “Pacific Rim of Wire,” and, 40 years after “Fat Angel,” it evoked similar feelings of mesmerizing newness. It was a night of electro-acoustic, trans-global music-making: Musicians at Dinkelspiel (the Stanford Laptop Orchestra, as well as players on traditional concert instruments) were literally – via the Internet, in real time – performing with musicians in China (on a smaller array of electronic and acoustic instruments).     The musicians in this “networked performance” – part of Stanford’s ongoing Pan-Asian Music Festival – could see one another, hear one another and respond musically to one another. The 200 or so listeners in Dinkelspiel could watch and hear not only the musicians on stage, but the musicians in China (6,000 miles distant and 15 hours ahead of California), whose images were projected on a giant screen at the rear of the stage. The small audience at Beijing University could see and hear everything happening in Dinkelspiel.     The combined sounds of two continents droned and pulsed, highly ritualistic, at times gorgeous, unfolding like electronic flowers, full of new moods and colors and tonalities – and, occasionally, they were a mishmash.     Still, the players were communing across the planet: This was the real Translove Airways.      I can’t say that Dinkelspiel is “the new Fillmore” – where all this goes is totally up in the air, and, besides, I’m a neophyte with this music.     But as was the case in the ’60s, what happened Tuesday night was about more than the music. It raised basic questions: What does it mean to “be here,” when here is there, and there is here? For that matter, what does it mean “to see” in this age of Skype and networked performances? After all, the musicians in China were seeing us, literally, and we were seeing them.     The concert was as much a technical as a musical coup, and the folks at Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) deserve credit for instigating and carrying it off in conjunction with the technical people in Beijing – who could be seen sipping bottled water and waving to the Dinkelspiel crowd during the performance.

China censors Internet–yea, good luck with that…

April 19, 2008

Protesters hold a “Support Olympics” banner at a Chinese branch of a French market chain. France is a target because the Olympic torch relay was disrupted there.From the Los Angeles Times By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer April 19, 2008 Picture Wu Hong / EPA click to read more.   
ANGER IS HIGH: Protesters hold a “Support Olympics” banner at a Chinese branch of a French market chain. France is a target because the Olympic torch relay was disrupted there.     Beijing has fanned the nationalism, critics say, but doesn’t want it to get out of hand before the Summer Olympics.     BEIJING — As Chinese nationalism flares across cyberspace, the government is growing concerned that passions could spill over into the real world, and that anger directed against foreigners could turn inward.     Critics contend that Beijing has had a role in fanning the xenophobic sentiment to counter international condemnation of its crackdown on Tibetan rioters, but now Chinese officials appear to be trying to rein in the vitriol.     Chinese censors have quietly warned cyber-police and Internet businesses to delete all information related to protests against Western policies, nations or companies that have proliferated in the wake of demonstrations surrounding the global Olympic torch relay and high-level calls to boycott the opening ceremony of the Summer Games in Beijing.–Ummmm, aren’t the Internet businesses they’re talking about Google and Yahoo?

Freedom, Beijing Style

April 7, 2008

Written by Angela Natividad on AdRANTs: Not all advertising for the Beijing Olympics is pretty and nice. Reporters without Borders is disseminating this image to remind Olympic fans how China treats reporters, activists and bloggers.     The home of the Great Firewall is under pressure to open the ‘net to journalists during the Games. “I’m satisfied that the Chinese understand the need for this and they will do it,” said Vice Chairman Kevan Gospar of the International Olympic Committee’s coordinating commission.